Now you see it, now you don’t…

Beauty is in the post production, as this video from Room demonstrates. Here are some stills, just in case you have trouble viewing it…

Pharell Williams Re-touched

Belly Re-touched

Busta-Rhymes-Re-touched

Britney Spears Re-touched

Room are (or were, since the link to their original site no longer works) a Californian post-production company. This show-reel of their work on music videos might act as a bit of a revelation to some (it was to me when I first saw it!) since, whilst we are becoming increasingly aware of the ‘Photoshopping’ of still images, the re-touching of film is still a bit of a mystery.

Warning: this video will lodge ‘So Fresh, So Clean‘ into your head, where it will play on repeat over and over for hours. Not necessarily a bad thing, and how appropriate a pairing is that song with this video? Look at all those ‘fresh’, pore-less faces! And, is it just me, or does this video tarnish Pharrell’s mystique a teensy bit…?

By: Sarah Barnes, 05.11.2009 | Comments (0)
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V Magazine: No make-up was harmed during the making of this shoot

V Magazine No Make-Up

It’s a bit dated now, but I am still captivated by this amazing, if slightly unnerving, make-up shoot from V Magazine where no make-up was actually used. Seriously, I think I could watch it scrolling through the make-up metamorphosis for hours on end.

As V themselves say; “In the future everyone will be beautiful. Until then, photographer Mario Sorrenti captures a naked face, and master digital artist Pascal Dangin goes pixel by pixel to apply the makeup of our technological fantasies”

This project, worked on by the ‘retoucher’s retoucher‘ Dangin, takes the discussion around the use of Photoshop in mainstream media image preparation to a whole new, very interesting and perplexing, level. We’re not just talking about ‘bettering an image’ here; this ‘Make-Up story’ is a complete fabrication, the “make-up of our technological fantasies” is a total illusion. That said, all the products ‘used’ are listed  – from YSL’s 4 Colour Harmony for Eyes in lavender to DiorBlush in precious pink. It’s all been ‘digitally sampled’ you see…

V’s shoot can really open our eyes to how far digital re-touching can (and, inevitably, will) go. In this context – a high concept, high fashion mag – arguments about unattainable beauty seem slightly lost; This experiment is clearly an attempt to push boundaries, rather than an endeavor to create facial perfection (love those grimaces!). Still, the worry still niggles that if V can do this, what will other magazines do in the future?

Putting The Beauty Myth aside for a second, I can actually appreciate the innovation displayed here. But I can’t help but wonder if any make-up artists would share in my enthusiasm?

(Images taken from ‘Interface’ Make-Up story, V47 May 15, 2007)

By: Sarah Barnes, 03.11.2009 | Comments (1)
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